We all know the typical IT behaviours and complaints about developers throwing seemingly untested solutions over the wall into production and leaving Operations to pick up the pieces. On the other hand, we hear Development complaining about the barriers put up by Operations that delay deployment, or workload demands placed on developers from  IT Operations, such as small updates, fixing issues and applications not working.

The increasing penetration of IT into all areas of the business and the desire for ever more and ever faster customer facing solutions is compounding the challenge even more. As a result, the workload for Development and IT Operations is growing, workflows are stuck and IT projects are failing, business executives are angry and frustrated, seeing lost business opportunities and risks to business operations.

Gene Kim, Kevin Behr and George Spafford wrote an excellent novel  “The Phoenix Project” about an organization facing these challenges and showed how to apply DevOps principles to achieve significant improvements and business value.

This simulation, by GamingWorks, is built around this ground-breaking book and lets you experience the dynamics of the book.

To find out more, download our brochure or contact us to discuss.

 

Why attend The Phoenix Project business simulation game?

 People are often sent on training courses to gain knowledge of particular subjects.  Usually, people are given the theory in traditional classroom courses or e-learning modules and are then left to gain the experience in a real life, often mission critical, environment, without guidance or support; then people complain that the best practice is no good, whereas a lot of the problems are associated with our inability to translate the theory into practice, and not understanding how to apply it.

A business simulation game is a form of experiential learning, or learning-by-doing. People learn, in a number of game rounds, to translate theory into practice. They learn how to use the theory to achieve measurable results.


Does this mean that they need to have attended a training course first? No, not at all.  By attending a business simulation with no preconceptions of the theory of “how to do it”, people learn as much as those who have attended training.  Sometimes more.


Are business simulation games only for IT? Again, no. Business simulation workshops like The Phoenix Project, allow those from the wider business to experience what IT experiences and learn how to build a closer working relationship with IT in a “safe” environment where everyone can try and fail, or try and succeed, without a business impact.